How Could a Christian Vote for Trump

John Christy
August 25, 2018
Articles
Both candidates have flaws that I could list of moral judgments, actions, and responses. Neither candidate is a representative of the Christian ideology, yet these are my choices.
How Could a Christian Vote for Trump
Audio Format: mp3

In response to the T&G article “Keep the Faith: How does a Christian vote for Trump?” by Rev. Jane A. Willan.

These days I am proud to say I am a Christian. I’m fully aware that we have given a label to our faith that extends beyond an identity as a follower of Jesus Christ and more of an affiliation to a political party. This is not the way I would have it, but I do not get to make that decision. That decision is made for me by the media and those speaking loudest on each side of the political spectrum. However, despite the label I am still proud to call myself a Christian. In fact, I am proud to call myself a Christian who did vote for President Donald Trump. In response to the article published which rhetorically asked how a Christian could vote for Trump, and then piously chastised those who claimed to follow Christ yet somehow voted for Trump, I felt the need to provide a reasoned response. The first flaw of the article is to use the dishonest tactic of a “Straw Man Argument”. This fallacy develops an argument that represents an opponent that does not exist and is easily defeated. To this point, the Rev. Jane A. Willan, painted a picture that unfairly characterized both the Trump Presidency as well as “Trump-supporting evangelicals”. While the space of this article will not permit me to respond directly to each of these mischaracterizations, I would like to address the bigger issue at hand, which is why, as a Christian I did vote for Trump.

First, I am a pragmatist and as such I did feel that the 2016 Presidential election was between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton. As aware as I was that there were other candidates, the reality of the situation was that one of the two aforementioned would be elected as President. Both candidates have flaws that I could list of moral judgments, actions, and responses. Neither candidate is a representative of the Christian ideology, yet these are my choices. Second, I registered myself as Republican during this election period not as much to support the Republican party, but more in opposition to the Democratic party. I felt the Democratic party was attempting to become an Oligarchy which was witnessed in the Democratic National Committee’s direct involvement with promoting Hillary Clinton while simultaneously demoting Bernie Sanders. I felt the Democratic party was approving of Monarchical power, where the former President Bill Clinton’s wife was not only Secretary of State but now a Presidential candidate herself. I do not want the “next person in line” to be thrusted to the highest authority in our country. I believe in a Democratic process where the people choose their representation, and this is not what I felt the Democratic Party was representing.

On a supportive note for candidate Donald Trump, while I did not vote for him in the primary election, I did listen to his campaign promises. He was going to support my conservative values. He would at the least interfere with and at the most completely dissolve the Federal funding of Planned Parenthood. He would remove the imposing and far-reaching regulations that the Federal Government has smothered American businesses with. He would disrupt the tyrannically enforced Federal Health Care program. He would eliminate the terrorist threat of ISIS. He would tighten our border security against criminals seeking to illegally enter the United States. He would cut taxes and reduce the unemployment rate.  He would nominate conservative Supreme Court Justices. He would end the unbalanced Iran deal. He would renegotiate NAFTA, TPP, and NATO. These are the reasons that as a Christian, I voted for Donald Trump.